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Extended Deadline of 12/13/21!

Extended Deadline of 12/13/21!

Mason's Center for Humanities Research has issued a call for papers for its first interdisciplinary symposium, "Pasts/Presents/Futures," seeking proposals from faculty and advanced PhD candidates. The symposium takes place April 7-8; proposals are due December 1.

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102,000 Afghans lived in the US as of 2019

102,000 Afghans lived in the US as of 2019

As part of its Immigration Data on Demand (iDod) project, the Institute for Immigration Research released a new fact sheet with data on Afghan immigrants in the United States. The fact sheet covers foreign-born Afghans in the United States as of 2019, but does not include data on the latest arrivals of the past two years. 

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Search Files Podcast

Search Files Podcast

Search Files covers trends in knowledge production and pedagogy. The hosts will hold monthly conversations with data analysts and educators/faculty from industry and academia. This first episode will feature a discussion on data visualization of academic knowledge production and will address approaches to teaching films in the classroom.

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Teaching the Arab Uprisings Ten Years On

Teaching the Arab Uprisings Ten Years On

Join us for the second monthly signature panel event of the Ten Years on Project: Mass Protests and Uprisings in the Arab World project. This is the second in a year-long series of events and knowledge production by the collaborative Ten Years On project. Panelists will discuss a range of ideas and reflections related to pedagogy and teaching the Arab Uprisings.

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“Ten Years On: Mass Protests and Uprisings in the Arab World” (Video)

“Ten Years On: Mass Protests and Uprisings in the Arab World” (Video)

This live event/video represents the launch of the one-year-long project “10 Years On: Mass Protests and Uprisings in the Arab World.” Ten years ago on 17 December 2010, Bouazizi immolated himself, ushering in what has come to be known as the Arab Uprisings. It addresses the contours of the project and introduces the partners involved. Our first panel will be held in late January 2021, and will address the broad historical context within which the uprisings take place.

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Status/الوضع Issue 7.2 is Here!

Status/الوضع Issue 7.2 is Here!

Just weeks before the presidential elections in the United States, and with the focus squarely on the prospects and possibilities of another four years under Donald Trump, at Status/الوضع, we stubbornly profess the importance of issues that go beyond and behind the headlines. So while we will likely examine the repercussions of this election in reflective ways, we chose not to churn out the usual (and increasingly tired) analyses and prognostications around US politics.

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University Announces 2020 Winter Graduation

University Announces 2020 Winter Graduation

All 2020 graduates, from spring, summer, and fall, are invited to participate in George Mason University’s 2020 Winter Graduation on Thursday, December 17, at 2:00 pm, on GMU-TV. Following the ceremony, CHSS graduates are invited to join the college for its own festivities.

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Finalists Announced for the New American Voices Award

Finalists Announced for the New American Voices Award

The three finalists for the 2020 Institute for Immigration Research New American Voices Award are novelists Ishmael Beah, author of Little Family; Vanessa Hua, author of Deceit and Other Possibilities; and Lysley Tenorio, author of The Son of Good Fortune.

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Status/الوضع Issue 7.1 is Here!

Status/الوضع Issue 7.1 is Here!

This issue of Status الوضع comes at an extraordinary time in our contemporary history, not just as a community of scholars, activists, writers, and artists concerned with the circumstances facing the peoples of the Middle East and North Africa, but rather as human beings around the world coming to terms with our collective ecology, economy, and politics.

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A message supporting our international students

A message supporting our international students

This week, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that it would discontinue visa exceptions for international students on F-1 visas who take all of their courses for the semester online. This decision could force hundreds of thousands of international students to leave the United States and threatens to interrupt the academic work of more than 3,000 students here at George Mason University.

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The Pandemic of White Supremacy

The Pandemic of White Supremacy

The recent events in Minneapolis precipitated by the police killing of George Floyd, along with related acts of high profile racialized violence directed at Black civilians, though seemingly distinct from the ongoing pandemic, are intimately connected via the systemic devaluation of Black life. Dr. Donna Auston is an anthropologist, writer, and activist whose body of work focuses primarily on race, ethnicity, gender, religion, media representation, and Islam in America.

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Latest University Information on COVID-19

Latest University Information on COVID-19

George Mason University is committed to protecting the health of its community. Its resources include up-to-date plans and procedures, identification of student health services clinics, and attention to its study-abroad programs.

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World Refugee Day 2019

World Refugee Day 2019

World Refugee Day is June 20th. Here are some quick facts about refugee admissions in the United States this year. The refugee ceiling is set at 30,000 for Fiscal Year 2019. Thus far into the fiscal year, the US has admitted 18,051 refugees, or 60 percent of the total allowable. It is likely that the US will not admit all 30,000 refugees this year.

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Event Announcement: "Money, Markets, & Monarchies: The GCC & the Political Economy of the Contemporary Middle East" - Book Talk by Adam Hanieh (June 7, 5:00 pm, GMU)

Event Announcement: "Money, Markets, & Monarchies: The GCC & the Political Economy of the Contemporary Middle East" - Book Talk by Adam Hanieh (June 7, 5:00 pm, GMU)

In Money, Markets, and Monarchies (Cambridge University Press, 2018), Adam Hanieh examines how the six states of the Gulf Cooperation Council are powerfully shaping the political economy of the wider Middle East. Through unprecedented and fine-grained empirical research - encompassing sectors such as agribusiness, real estate, finance, retail, telecommunications, and urban utilities - the book lays out the pivotal role of the Gulf in the affairs of other Arab states, and asks what this might mean for the future of the region.

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Roundtable on the Past and Present of Electricity in Lebanon

Roundtable on the Past and Present of Electricity in Lebanon

Electricity features centrally in Lebanon, both at the level of political discourse and daily life. Residents of the country have long experienced the rationing and unscheduled interruptions of electric supply. In addition, private generator owners charge building and neighborhood residents exorbitant prices to supplement the services of the state-owned Electricite du Liban.

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Surpassing Statehood, Approximating Hope: Book Launch for Justice for Some

Surpassing Statehood, Approximating Hope: Book Launch for Justice for Some

2017 marked 100 years since the British Empire designated Palestine as a site of Jewish settlement thus setting in motion a settler-colonial project featuring native elimination. Palestinians have fervently resisted their erasure and have successfully inscribed their juridical status as a people in international law and legal instruments and established their associated right to self-determination.

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Quick Thoughts: Thomas Serres on Algeria’s Protests

Quick Thoughts: Thomas Serres on Algeria’s Protests

Algeria has in recent weeks been gripped by a growing wave of popular demonstrations, which are reaching a crescendo as the closing date for nominations for the 18 April presidential elections approaches. Central in this equation is the prospective candidacy of President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, incapacitated for several years and demonstrably incapable of leading the country or its government.

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We Made Every Living Thing From Water: An Interview with Karim Eid-Sabbagh

We Made Every Living Thing From Water: An Interview with Karim Eid-Sabbagh

Since the garbage crisis began in Lebanon in 2015, the country's environmental credentials have been repeatedly called into question by the international community and its own citizens. The ecological crisis exacerbated, and was exacerbated by, problems of water resource management. The sorry state of water infrastructure is at the root of Lebanon being among the world's top-fifteen per-capita consumers of bottled water. This plastic can be found everywhere, literally covering beaches, degrading in open dumps across the country, and burning with other garbage as seepage and toxins intensify pollution.

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Ella Shohat, On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements: Selected Writings (New Texts Out Now)

Ella Shohat, On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements: Selected Writings (New Texts Out Now)

In concrete terms, this project, spanning four decades of writing, came into existence over five years ago thanks to the initiative of Pluto Press. In conversation with colleagues, students, and activists, I realized that such a collection could serve to document the trajectory of a debate. This collection hosts texts drawn from diverse sources and belonging to divergent genres: essays, lectures, conversations, and memoir pieces.

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Essential Readings: Piracy in the Persian Gulf by Johan Mathew

Essential Readings: Piracy in the Persian Gulf by Johan Mathew

Piracy is one of those activities that vie for the title of the world’s second oldest profession. It is undoubtedly the case that homo sapiens engaged in maritime raiding well before the dawn of recorded history. Some of the oldest extant texts produced by human beings – cuneiform tablets from ancient Mesopotamia – discuss the taking of booty and maritime raids between the various city-states and empires around the coasts of the Persian (or Arabian) Gulf.[1] Thus, there is little question that piracy in general, and piratical raids in the Gulf in particular, are among the most ancient activities undertaken by human civilizations.

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The Climate of Middle East Studies

The Climate of Middle East Studies

Climate change’s violent impacts are expected to be particularly grave in the Middle East. Like Kolkata and New York, rising sea levels will inundate coastal cities around the Mediterranean and Persian Gulf. By the end of this century, soaring daytime temperatures could make substantial parts of North Africa and the Gulf uninhabitable.

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NEWTON Bouquet, "Morocco Matters"

NEWTON Bouquet, "Morocco Matters"

The editors kick off 2019 with a NEWTON Bouquet focusing on Morocco. Morocco has a rich history of popular mobilization, political protest, and has been embroiled in conflict over the Western Sahara. For those reasons and many others, the following NEWTON selections remind us that Morocco, too, has a rich and complex social, economic, and political history that deserves to be explored and studied by students, scholars, and the enthusiasts alike.

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Sophia Hoffman, Iraqi Migrants in Syria: The Crisis Before the Storm (New Texts Out Now)

Sophia Hoffman, Iraqi Migrants in Syria: The Crisis Before the Storm (New Texts Out Now)

After finishing my post-graduate studies in London in 2004, I trained as a journalist and then moved to Damascus to pick up some foreign correspondence work. I quickly became gripped with curiosity about how politics worked in Syria, both in the day to day, and on the international level. Everyday life in Syria seemed governed by a mix of intense fear and relaxed, easy-going attitudes that I really wanted to understand better.

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The Year in Art 2018

The Year in Art 2018

Seeking to gauge the year in art, Jadaliyya’s Culture page invited artists, writers, and other cultural practitioners to share their thoughts on some of the most impactful shows of 2018. Together, the reviews below reflect how curatorial practices, particularly in the context of institutions (museums, biennials, and universities), are rapidly changing in order to meet the current demands of criticism and art historical discourse.

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NEWTON Bouquet, "All Things Syria"

NEWTON Bouquet, "All Things Syria"

For our December NEWTON bouquet, we chose to focus on Syria, in the wake of both a devastating year, and the announcement by US President Donald Trump that US military personnel will soon withdraw. The NEWTON selections comprising this last Bouquet of 2018 discuss the current conflict in terms of migration and displacement, gender and sexuality, and authoritarianism, as they relate to Syria's past, present, and/or future.   

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Essential Readings: Uprisings, Resistance, and Popular Mobilization (by Asef Bayat)

Essential Readings: Uprisings, Resistance, and Popular Mobilization (by Asef Bayat)

Middle East studies has traditionally paid more attention to the elite power than the people in subverting that power. The recent Essential Reading compiled by Lisa Anderson in Jadaliyya guides us to a fine collection of publications on the states and regimes in the Middle East since the 1970s. However, serious works on contentious politics, social movements, and resistance in the region have been quite recent.

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Essential Readings: Revolutions in the Contemporary Middle East by Jack Goldstone

Essential Readings: Revolutions in the Contemporary Middle East by Jack Goldstone

The Arab world reeled from revolutions during the 1950s and 1960s. These decades included the Egyptian Nationalist Revolution of 1952 led by Gamal Abdul Nasser, the September 1 Revolution in Libya led by Col. Muammar Gaddafi, the 14 July Revolution in Iraq that overthrew the Hashemite monarchy, and the Algerian Revolution of 1954-1962 against French colonial rule.

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Essential Readings: Uprisings, Resistance, and Popular Mobilization in the Middle East and North Africa (by John Chalcraft)

Essential Readings: Uprisings, Resistance, and Popular Mobilization in the Middle East and North Africa (by John Chalcraft)

There is a growing literature on uprisings, resistance and popular mobilisation in the Middle East and North Africa. While much of the conventional wisdom on the region is top-down, researchers are slowing building up a more developed and diverse understanding of how oppressed and excluded groups of all kinds have struggled to change their conditions, and what this has meant.

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Essential Readings: Iraq (by Fanar Haddad)

Essential Readings: Iraq (by Fanar Haddad)

Iraqi history does not begin with the modern Iraqi state, but my research interests and constraints of time and space force me to restrict my contribution to the modern national era and its immediate antecedents. Given its decades of inaccessibility, it is ironic that Iraq today offers scholars one of the most researcher-friendly environments in the region–at least where political repression and censorship are concerned.

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Authoritarian Apprehensions: Ideology, Judgement, and Mourning in Syria

Authoritarian Apprehensions: Ideology, Judgement, and Mourning in Syria

If the Arab uprisings initially seemed to herald the end of tyrannies and a move toward liberal democratic governments, their defeat not only marks a reversal but is of a piece with new forms of authoritarianism worldwide. Scholars have begun wondering, with some urgency, why citizens themselves seem so often to be attracted to autocracy.

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Faculty Reports from Abroad: Two Roundtables

Faculty Reports from Abroad: Two Roundtables

JOIN US FOR FACULTY FIRST HAND OBSERVATIONS FROM  PAKISTAN, UK, SPAIN, CHINA, MEXICO, SOUTH KOREA, PALESTINE,  PUERTO RICO, CENTRAL ASIA, LEBANON, SCOTLAND, RUSSIA, UKRAINE FOLLOWED BY Q&A AND CONVERSATION

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Political Economy Summer Institute (2019): Call for Applications

Political Economy Summer Institute (2019): Call for Applications

We are writing to solicit applications from doctoral students and other researchers for our fourth Political Economy Summer Institute to be held in 6-10 June 2019 at George Mason University on the political economy of the Middle East (6 June is arrival day). The aim of the Political Economy Summer Institute (PESI) is both to provide graduate level engagement and instruction as well as to connect doctoral students and independent researchers with mid-career and senior scholars working in the field of critical political economy.

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Nadine Sika, Youth Activism and Contentious Politics in Egypt: Dynamics of Continuity and Change (New Texts Out Now)

Nadine Sika, Youth Activism and Contentious Politics in Egypt: Dynamics of Continuity and Change (New Texts Out Now)

During the Egyptian uprising of 2011, I was interested not only in participating in the demonstrations, but as a political scientist, I was also interested in understanding the motives behind why people turned out and mobilized against Mubarak. A few months after the uprisings, Oliver Schlumberger proposed that I participate in a research project on youth in the region in cooperation with him and Saloua Zerhouni.

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Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Summer 2018 (Part 2)

Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Summer 2018 (Part 2)

The Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) brings you the fifth in a series of "Peer-Reviewed Article Reviews" in which we present a collection of journals and their articles concerned with the Middle East and Arab world. This series will be published seasonally. Each issue will comprise one-to-three parts, depending on the number of articles included.

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Essential Readings: Said’s Orientalism, Its Interlocutors, and Its Influence (by Anthony Alessandrini)

Essential Readings: Said’s Orientalism, Its Interlocutors, and Its Influence (by Anthony Alessandrini)

It is perhaps not an exaggeration to say that Edward Said’s Orientalism changed the world. It is certainly no exaggeration to say, somewhat more modestly, that it changed how we see the world. Even the book’s harshest critics have been forced to acknowledge its influence; indeed, part of the animus against Orientalism has come from the fact that it has not only transformed numerous academic disciplines, but also has, unlike few academic books of its time, broken out of the walls of the academy and into the minds of millions.

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NEWTON Bouquet, "The Politics of Artistic Expression in the Middle East" (August 2018)

NEWTON Bouquet, "The Politics of Artistic Expression in the Middle East" (August 2018)

For our August 2018 NEWTON bouquet, we chose to focus on different modes of artistic expression in the Middle East, as it is crucial to recognize the deep and abiding connection between art and politics in the region. Literature, art, music, and film (as well as other creative mediums) are often utilized by individuals looking to express or convey a political or social message in constrained political environments where blatant political speech is discouraged or suppressed.

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Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Summer 2018 (Part 1)

Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Summer 2018 (Part 1)

The Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) brings you the fifth in a series of "Peer-Reviewed Article Reviews" in which we present a collection of journals and their articles concerned with the Middle East and Arab world. This series will be published seasonally. Each issue will comprise one-to-three parts, depending on the number of articles included.

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Essential Readings: Women's and Gender History in the Early Modern/Modern Middle East (by Judith Tucker)

Essential Readings: Women's and Gender History in the Early Modern/Modern Middle East (by Judith Tucker)

The field of women’s and gender history of the early modern/modern Middle East has been thriving over the past couple of decades. It is a particularly quixotic quest, then, to distill it down to a handful of signal contributions. I have chosen a few of the central themes as I see them, limited myself to two or three works in English each, and proceeded idiosyncratically–this is not a “best books” list, but rather a reflection on a few of the books that seem to me influential in terms of the ways they capture historiographical developments or set research agendas.

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Anthony Gorman and Didier Monciaud, eds., The Press in the Middle East and North Africa, 1850-1950: Politics, Social History and Culture (New Texts Out Now)

Anthony Gorman and Didier Monciaud, eds., The Press in the Middle East and North Africa, 1850-1950: Politics, Social History and Culture (New Texts Out Now)

The book came out of an original idea that Didier Monciaud and I had for a workshop at the Mediterranean Conference of the European University Institute held at Montecatini some years ago. This brought together a diverse group of scholars who were working on different aspects of the history of the Middle Eastern press and provided a forum for a productive and reflective series of discussions on this important medium, both as a reflection and an agent of historical change.

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Announcing the Latin East Initiative (Jadaliyya, NACLA, and MERIP)

Announcing the Latin East Initiative (Jadaliyya, NACLA, and MERIP)

Jadaliyya is happy to announce the launching of The Latin East initiative, a joint collaboration with the North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA) and the Middle East Research and Information Project (MERIP). So far, the initiative has resulted in the publication of special issues by both NACLA Report and Middle East Report as well as an international conference hosted at NYU on 27-28 April 2018.

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The Future of Political Islam in the Middle East and North Africa under the Changing Regional Order (Jadaliyya and Maydan Roundtable)

The Future of Political Islam in the Middle East and North Africa under the Changing Regional Order (Jadaliyya and Maydan Roundtable)

The Arab Uprisings led not only to upheaval in domestic politics in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) but also to a change in the regional power balance. The so-called “counter-revolutionary states” of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Egypt on the one hand and the camp that is more amenable to Islamists comprised mainly of Qatar, Turkey, and their Islamist allies on the other hand have been competing for regional upper-hand since 2011.

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Essential Readings: The United States and Iraq before Saddam Hussein’s Rule (by Brandon Wolfe-Hunnicutt)

Essential Readings: The United States and Iraq before Saddam Hussein’s Rule (by Brandon Wolfe-Hunnicutt)

The Essential Readings series is curated by the Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) team at the Arab Studies Institute. MESPI invites scholars to contribute to our Essential Readings modules by submitting an “Essential Readings” list on a topic/theme pertinent to their research/specialization in Middle East studies. Authors are asked to keep the selection relatively short while providing as much representation/diversity as possible. This difficult task may ultimately leave out numerous works which merit inclusion from different vantage points. Each topic may eventually be addressed by more than one author.Articles such as this will appear permanently on www.MESPI.org and www.Jadaliyya.com. Email us at info@MESPI.org for any inquiries.

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Samer N. Abboud, Syria (New Texts Out Now)

Samer N. Abboud, Syria (New Texts Out Now)

The original impetus for writing this book came in late 2013. Serendipitously, Louise Knight at Polity contacted me around that time to write something about the Syrian conflict, and by 2015, the first edition of the book came out. In that edition, my analysis was motivated by the question of how a military and political stalemate emerged in Syria. By 2015, authority over the country’s geography was in constant flux, and there was no serious political process to bring about the end of the conflict.

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Arab Studies Journal Announces Spring 2018 Issue: Editor's Note and Table of Contents

Arab Studies Journal Announces Spring 2018 Issue: Editor's Note and Table of Contents

We are proud to feature a diverse array of disciplines and approaches in this issue. In “The Nahda in Parliament: Taha Husayn’s Career Building Knowledge Production Institutions, 1922-1952” Hussam R. Ahmed traces the bureaucratic and institutional force of one of the most influential intellectuals of the twentieth century. He reveals new ways to think about the ties between intellectual work, knowledge production, pedagogy, and the Egyptian state. In “‘Jerusalem, We Have a Problem’: Larissa Sansour’s Sci-Fi Trilogy and the Impetus of Dystopic Imagination,” Gil Hochberg offers a reading of both the colonial legacies of the sci-fi genre and the potential for its radical upending.

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Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Spring 2018 (Part 3)

Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Spring 2018 (Part 3)

The Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) brings you the fourth in a series of "Peer-Reviewed Article Reviews" in which we present a collection of journals and their articles concerned with the Middle East and Arab world. This series will be published seasonally. Each issue will comprise one-to-three parts, depending on the number of articles included.

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Essential Readings: The Syrian Uprising (by Raymond Hinnebusch)

Essential Readings: The Syrian Uprising (by Raymond Hinnebusch)

The Essential Readings series is curated by the Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) team at the Arab Studies Institute. MESPI invites scholars to contribute to our Essential Readings modules by submitting an “Essential Readings” list on a topic/theme pertinent to their research/specialization in Middle East studies. Authors are asked to keep the selection relatively short while providing as much representation/diversity as possible. This difficult task may ultimately leave out numerous works which merit inclusion from different vantage points. Each topic may eventually be addressed by more than one author. Articles such as this will appear permanently on www.MESPI.org and www.Jadaliyya.com. Email us at info@MESPI.org for any inquiries.

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Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Spring 2018 (Part 2)

Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Spring 2018 (Part 2)

The Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) brings you the fourth in a series of "Peer-Reviewed Article Reviews" in which we present a collection of journals and their articles concerned with the Middle East and Arab world. This series will be published seasonally. Each issue will comprise one-to-three parts, depending on the number of articles included.

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Essential Readings on Algeria (by Muriam Haleh Davis and Thomas Serres)

Essential Readings on Algeria (by Muriam Haleh Davis and Thomas Serres)

The Essential Readings series is sponsored by the Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) team at the Arab Studies Institute. MESPI invites scholars to contribute to our Essential Readings Modules by submitting or suggesting an “Essential Readings” topic pertinent to the Middle East. Articles such as this will appear permanently on both www.MESPI.org and www.Jadaliyya.com.

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Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Spring 2018 (Part 1)

Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Spring 2018 (Part 1)

The Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) brings you the fourth in a series of "Peer-Reviewed Article Reviews" in which we present a collection of journals and their articles concerned with the Middle East and Arab world. This series will be published seasonally. Each issue will comprise one-to-three parts, depending on the number of articles included.

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Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Fall/Winter 2017/2018 (Part 3)

Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Fall/Winter 2017/2018 (Part 3)

The Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) brings you the third part in a series of "Peer-Reviewed Article Reviews" in which we present a collection of journals and their articles concerned with the Middle East and Arab world. This series will be published seasonally.

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Essential Readings on Labor in the Middle East (by Joel Beinin)

Essential Readings on Labor in the Middle East (by Joel Beinin)

The Essential Readings series is sponsored by the Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) team at the Arab Studies Institute. MESPI invites scholars to contribute to our Essential Readings Modules by submitting or suggesting an “Essential Readings” topic pertinent to the Middle East. Articles such as this will appear permanently on both www.MESPI.org and www.Jadaliyya.com.

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Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Winter/Spring 2017 (Part 3)

Peer-Reviewed Articles Review: Winter/Spring 2017 (Part 3)

The Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) brings you the third in a series of "Peer-Reviewed Article Reviews" in which we present a collection of journals and their articles concerned with the Middle East and Arab world. This series will be published seasonally. Each issue will comprise one-to-three parts, depending on the number of articles included.

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The Army, Economy, & Discontent in Egypt

The Army, Economy, & Discontent in Egypt

From a political economy approach, this talk follows how Egypt’s military institution has been visibly, or often invisibly, controlling the economy and state in the past three decades. Uniquely in its regional context, the Egyptian army has survived and adapted to crucial moments of change and revolutionary shifts. After decades of espousing socialism, it weathered a period of fundamental transition into the market economy in the 1990s-2000s.

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Civil War, Economic Governance & State Reconstruction in the Middle East

Civil War, Economic Governance & State Reconstruction in the Middle East

Wednesday, 18 April | 12pm Arlington, Founders Hall, Rm. 210 Event Streamed to Fairfax, Merten Hall, Rm. 1203 Since 2011, peaceful protests by citizens demanding political and economic change in Syria, Yemen, and Libya, have collapsed into violent conflicts. For many scholars of civil war and conflict economics, and for practitioners in the fields of development, peacebuilding, and post-conflict reconstruction, civil wars in the Middle East are the result of predictable causes—institutional failures defined in terms of state fragility—have followed predictable pathways marked by the breakdown of pre-war systems of governance, and will require predictable remedies to restore stability and repair local economies and societies.

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Fear and Foreboding in Syria

Fear and Foreboding in Syria

“Fear and Foreboding” is excerpted from chapter five of Lisa Wedeen’s new book project, Authoritarian Apprehensions: Ideology, Judgment, and Mourning in Syria. In this presentation, she considers the workings of ideology in times of tumult—analyzing the hardening of sectarian identifications in the context of neoliberal autocracy’s unraveling and retrenchment in Syria.

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MESPI is Launched!

MESPI is Launched!

The Middle East Studies Pedagogy Initiative (MESPI) brings you the first in a series of "Peer-Reviewed Article Reviews" in which we present a collection of journals and their articles concerned with the Middle East and Arab world. This series will be published three times a year, covering summer, fall, and spring. Each issue will comprise one-to-three parts, depending on the number of articles included.

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MEIS Annual Lecture

MEIS Annual Lecture

On Tuesday, October 24 the Middle East & Islamic Studies (MEIS) program hosted its Annual Lecture, Palestine Anatomy of An Abyss led by Mouin Rabbani. He is an independent analyst, commentator, and researcher specializing in the contemporary Middle East.

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MEIS Accelerated Master’s Information Session

MEIS Accelerated Master’s Information Session

Join us on Wednesday, October 18, 2017, to learn about the benefits of the Accelerated Master’s program. You will have the chance to review your degree requirements for eligibility and receive information on the application process and timeframe.

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Celebrating success

Celebrating success

The mood in EagleBank Arena was lively on May 18 and 19, as the College of Humanities and Social Sciences held its degree celebration ceremonies. Congratulations again to all of our graduates! We are pleased to welcome you to an impressive community of alumni, made only stronger by the class of 2017.

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Reflections on the United States  and the Middle East

Reflections on the United States and the Middle East

Robert Malley was appointed Vice President for Policy at the International Crisis Group in March 2017. He had been Special Assistant to the President, Senior Advisor to the President for the Counter-ISIL campaign, and White House Coordinator for the Middle East, North Africa and Gulf Region in 2015-2016; prior to that he was Senior Director for the Gulf Region and Syria.

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THEEB: Film Screening and Discussion, April 20

THEEB: Film Screening and Discussion, April 20

1916. While war rages in the Ottoman Empire, Hussein raises his younger brother Theeb in a traditional Bedouin community that is isolated by the vast, unforgiving desert. The brothers' quiet existence is suddenly interrupted when a British Army officer and his guide ask Hussein to escort them to a water well located along the old pilgrimage route to Mecca.

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Political Economy of Development Series

Political Economy of Development Series

1. Development Under Authoritarian Rule: Tuesday, February 21, 12 pm 2. Workshop on Development: February 28, 12 pm 3. Political Economy of Oil: April 4 4. Workshop on oil : April 11, 12 pm

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Conference On Security in The Maghreb-Sahel

Conference On Security in The Maghreb-Sahel

The Maghreb-Sahel region sits at the center of some of the most significant challenges facing the world today, ranging from terrorism to refugees, from poverty to weak institutions. Please join experts from the United States Institute of Peace, the Center for Strategic and International Studies, RAND Corporation, the Embassies of Mali and Niger, the World Bank, and more, in a discussion of these challenges.

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Xenophobia and Islamophobia in the Modern Era

Xenophobia and Islamophobia in the Modern Era

In recent years, the United States has witnessed an increase in xenophobic and Islamophobic rhetoric. The prevalence of inaccurate information about immigrants and Muslims has resulted in significant fear and mistrust in many communities. This panel discussion will present facts about these two specific groups in order to promote greater understanding and empower audience members to engage in informed activism.

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STATUS/الوضع Issue 3.1 is Out!

STATUS/الوضع Issue 3.1 is Out!

Amidst the rambunctious MESA (Middle East Studies Association) conference atmosphere, we and all our partner organizations are happy to announce the release of STATUS/الوضع Issue 2.3. By far, this is our richest and most diverse issue yet, with something for every taste, whether it is current events, history, culture, poetry, music, or otherwise. Lots of gratitude to our guests, hosts, and team for delivering this colossal installment. With Status turning one, and just prior to a major overhaul of our online platform, we are proud to present our latest installment of interviews in our most stellar issue yet! This issue will be remembered for being the one with the most Arabic language interviews to date. This is not an arbitrary coincidence, but rather a testament to our commitment to ground the topics we discuss in regional dynamics and local intricacies. Along with partner organizations, we are happy to announce the release of STATUS/الوضع Issue 3.1 [See Arabic here], our most ambitious issue yet

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The New Realities in the Middle East with David Imad Ramadan

The New Realities in the Middle East with David Imad Ramadan

The complexities of the region make the course a perfect fit for the Global Affairs program’s interdisciplinary approach. The goal of the course is to provide students with rich knowledge of the Middle East that is not just history and not just politics, that allows students to really work through the context and complexities of current events.

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Debating Modern Revolution; Jack Censer Launches Latest Book

Debating Modern Revolution; Jack Censer Launches Latest Book

The book is a consideration of "modern" revolutions, those that seek to bring about changes to society that implement a new ideal, as opposed to a reversion to any system in place before. “The idea of revolution is only going to run out of steam when people stop believing in positive changes that can be made here on Earth,” Censer explains.

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NPR Correspondent Tom Gjelten speaks at IIR Colloquium

NPR Correspondent Tom Gjelten speaks at IIR Colloquium

The Institute for Immigration Research (IIR) hosted Tom Gjelten, correspondent for National Public Radio and author of A Nation of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story, at the April colloquium. Mr. Gjelten shared his insights on how the landscape of America has changed over the past fifty years with the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, as told through the experiences of families in one suburban county in Virginia.

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“Kandahar Journals”: Conflict without Conclusion

“Kandahar Journals”: Conflict without Conclusion

Last Monday, photojournalist Louie Palu screened his film “Kandahar Journals” in the Johnson Center Cinema as part of the Visiting Filmmakers Series sponsored by GMU's Film and Media Studies. The film focuses on Palu’s experiences as an embedded photojournalist in the Kandahar province of Afghanistan from 2006 to 2010.

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Spring 2016 Courses Announced

Spring 2016 Courses Announced

Courses for both the undergraduate Islamic Studies minor and graduate MA in Middle East & Islamic Studies are now listed online. Registration for the Spring 2016 semester began on November 3 and will remain open until January 26.

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Bodies Of Revolution: Gender, the State, and Violence in the Arab Uprisings

Bodies Of Revolution: Gender, the State, and Violence in the Arab Uprisings

Sherene Seikaly studies the gendered experiences and representations of the Arab body to reveal the stakes of state violence and revolutionary change. She explores how people like Muhamad Bouazizi and Samira Ibrahim mobilized their bodies as sites of revolutionary possibility, detailing both the lost histories of state gendered violence as well as the many attempts to confront and resist it.

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New Texts Out Now: Ali Issa, Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle in Iraq

New Texts Out Now: Ali Issa, Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle in Iraq

Collected from dozens of interviews with, and reports from, Iraqi feminists, labor organizers, environmentalists, and protest movement leaders, Against All Odds presents the unique voices of progressive Iraqi organizing on the ground. Dating back to 2003, with an emphasis on the 2011 upsurge in mobilization and hope as well as the subsequent embattled years, these voices belong to Iraqis asserting themselves as agents against multiple local, regional, and global forces of oppression.

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Jadaliyya: NEWTON 2015 in Review

Jadaliyya: NEWTON 2015 in Review

Since it was first launched in the fall of 2011, the New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) Page has been honored to have the opportunity to feature an astonishing range of books, articles, special issues of journals, and films for Jadaliyya readers. This past year was no exception. With authors generously agreeing to discuss their new works, offer background information on their research, and allow us to post excerpts from their books and articles, we have been able to offer first looks at some of the most important new work in the field, from established names and rising stars alike.

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Arab Studies Journal - Call for Papers - "Wayn al-Dawleh?"

Arab Studies Journal - Call for Papers - "Wayn al-Dawleh?"

Themed issue of the Arab Studies Journal on "Wayn al-Dawleh?" In Search of the Lebanese State. ASJ seeks submissions for a special issue whose premise is the viability of the Lebanese state. We particularly encourage contributions that explicitly engage with theories of the state. The call is open to all disciplines and a wide range of methodological approaches, including ethnography, case study comparison, historical research, and discourse analysis.

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Middle East Studies Magazine Recognized in New York Times

Middle East Studies Magazine Recognized in New York Times

Jadaliyya, co-founded by the director of Mason’s Middle East Studies Program Bassam Haddad, provides in-depth commentary on current events and culture in the Middle East. It has received high praise from scholars in the field with articles regularly appearing on college class syllabi across the country.

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Celebrating and Learning About Arabic Language and Culture

Celebrating and Learning About Arabic Language and Culture

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages, the global affairs program, and the Middle East and Islamic studies program worked together to host the university's first Arab Culture Day on October 30, bringing the sounds and color of Arab nations to the North Plaza of the Fairfax Campus.

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Stephen Day, Regionalism and Rebellion in Yemen

Stephen Day, Regionalism and Rebellion in Yemen

My book fits into a category of new studies in the field of contemporary history, politics, culture, religion, and international relations concerning the underlying dynamics of the 2011 Arab democratic spring. Readers of the book will learn that Yemen stands out as a unique participant in this dramatic moment of world history.

Mason now offers Master’s Degree in Middle East and Islamic Studies

Mason now offers Master’s Degree in Middle East and Islamic Studies

The Ali Vural Ak Center and the Middle East Studies Program are pleased to announce that the interdisciplinary Master’s degree program in Middle East and Islamic Studies has been approved by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. The program launches formally in Fall 2013, but Mason has accepted a small group of applicants for earlier admission in Spring 2013.

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Mason Welcomes New Islamic Studies Program Director

Mason Welcomes New Islamic Studies Program Director

George Mason University welcomes Dr. Cemil Aydin as the new director of its Center for Global Islamic Studies. Aydin joined Mason’s History and Art History Department in the fall of 2009, holding the Endowed IIIT Chair in Islamic Studies, bringing with him years of experience in the fields of history and Middle Eastern studies.

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Religious Studies Welcomes Islamic Studies Professor

Religious Studies Welcomes Islamic Studies Professor

This fall, the Religious Studies Department welcomes Dr. Juliane Hammer to its distinguished list of professors. Dr. Hammer, who received her PhD in Islamic studies from Humboldt University in Berlin, has a wealth of experience in teaching Islamic studies having taught at Princeton, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Elon University.

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